Soil Carbon

Soil Carbon

A 5% national market shift to regenerative poultry will have a system-level impact of significant proportions and consequence. The RAA’s goal is to reach this tipping point by engaging upwards of 3 million acres of land under regenerative management, which will restore between 44.8 and 60 million metric tons of carbon back to the soil through regenerative poultry and allied regenerative industry sectors. Regenerating the landscape requires that aligned sectors come together to coordinate the building of physical and institutional infrastructure across the land.

Starting in the Midwest and focusing on specific regions, it is practical and feasible to aggregate small, mid-size and large farms into collective regional clusters or producer pools. Central to this aggregation is the pursuit of ecological defragmentation strategies. Namely, aggregating acreage by focusing on areas where farmers may be more likely to cooperate with each other to create ecological continuity. It is through defragmentation of the landscape from an ecological perspective that larger carbon sequestration and the multitude of economic and ecological benefits can materialize.

Although easier to do when engaging larger-scale farm operations, defragmentation is a matter of strategically engaging multi-year and even multi-generational strategies. This means planning for hundreds of years ahead of our time, imagining future landscapes and then selecting and targeting areas where a higher impact may be achieved, especially economically so that the incentive is there to focus on carbon farming.

One area of great opportunity is the Indian reservations. There are over 56 million acres already in the hands of Native communities. Too often this land is unavailable to their own reservation residents, but this reality has been resolved where coordinated efforts between the tribal councils, economic development organizations, and farming enterprises for and by the Natives in the reservation have come together. Strategically and operationally, it is by enhancing the ability of Native communities that a high-level of carbon sequestration can be achieved and along with this goal, build food sovereign reservations, create wealth through regenerative land management and reposition tribal communities to become critical centers of food production at scale for the rest of the nation.